Critical Reading in Early Childhood Studies

 
“I just want to ask if you did find hard to help me with the Norway film could you instead Analyse one Academic book for children ?

The book called Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman.Caroline Binch
FRAME FOR ANALYSING CHILDREN’S LITERATURE

Sharing literature with young children is about enjoyment and learning, but what are they learning?. Thinking critically about books and ‘reading between the lines’, helps those who work with young children make that sharing as rich as possible.

{or something like that}
Bibliographic details
this section = the same

Summarise the story. e.g.Who are the characters? When and where is the story set? What happens?
What is the underlying idea or message? What would the story encourage children to think about? e.g. right and wrong, conflict, different points of view, identity…
How is the story written and why? e.g. Are sentences short or long, descriptive or action-packed? What sort of vocabulary is used (alliteration, repetition…)? What mood/tone does that create?
Describe and comment on the illustrations
e.g. sensitive, detailed, humorous… How do the illustrations work with the written text? What impact might the pictures have on the reader?
Reflect on why you chose this book and what you think are its strengths (and weaknesses, if any). And how you might use this with young children?”


A message from client:
“I just want to ask if you did find hard to help me with the Norway film could you instead Analyse one Academic book for children ?

The book called Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman.Caroline Binch
FRAME FOR ANALYSING CHILDREN’S LITERATURE

Sharing literature with young children is about enjoyment and learning, but what are they learning?. Thinking critically about books and ‘reading between the lines’, helps those who work with young children make that sharing as rich as possible.

{or something like that}
Bibliographic details
this section = the same

Summarise the story. e.g.Who are the characters? When and where is the story set? What happens?
What is the underlying idea or message? What would the story encourage children to think about? e.g. right and wrong, conflict, different points of view, identity…
How is the story written and why? e.g. Are sentences short or long, descriptive or action-packed? What sort of vocabulary is used (alliteration, repetition…)? What mood/tone does that create?
Describe and comment on the illustrations
e.g. sensitive, detailed, humorous… How do the illustrations work with the written text? What impact might the pictures have on the reader?
Reflect on why you chose this book and what you think are its strengths (and weaknesses, if any). And how you might use this with young children?”

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