Core Concepts (History, World View, Values) Outline & Speech Packet

 

Core Concepts (History, World View, Values) Outline & Speech Packet
Communication 1: Public Speaking

 

GUIDE FOR PLANNING THE INFORMATIVE SPEECH

THE INTRODUCTION

1. Get attention by using one or more of the following choices:
An illustration or story
A startling statement
A quotation
A rhetorical question
A reference to the subject
A reference to the occasion (what makes this day unique)
2. Motivate audience interest in your subject by alluding to the practical value of the information for your audience / a reason to listen or the

audience’s sense of curiosity.
3. Establish your right to inform (speaker credibility) by alluding to any first-hand experience you may have had or alluding to sources of

information you have consulted.
4. Provide orienting material by:
Previewing main points
Defining technical terms that you will be using
If necessary supplying any background information that would better enable listeners to understand the information

THE BODY
1. Choose 3 main points of equal weight that directly support your specific purpose.
2. Make your information understandable by using an organizational format
Chronological or step-by-step order
Causal
Spatial
Topical
3. Support your main points with appropriate evidence
Factual examples and illustrations
Specific instances
Expert Testimony
Analogies
Statistics
4. Make your information understandable by using visual aids
Charts, drawings, slides
Objects or models of objects
Diagrams, maps
5. Make your information interesting
By using vivid imagery
Concrete language
Having it at a level appropriate to your audience
Involving something recent, impending, familiar, using appropriate humor
6. Use transitions between main points

THE CONCLUSION
1. End the speech appropriately by utilizing a summary and restatement of main points.
2. End the speech providing us with a “reason to remember”
A quotation
A story
An allusion to the introduction or another technique to arouse interest in further investigation

ASSIGNMENT: Core Concepts —
Outline & Speech

Outline: Each student will use proper subordination to write out an introduction, body, and conclusion describing a particular topic from their cultural

group. It should be typed, double-spaced, using formal grammar, punctuation, and spelling. Use a full sentence outline for the body, but do not write

the speech. Grades will be based on attention to detail in formatting, grammar, punctuation, etc., as well as the quality and organization of your

outline content (See sample outline grading sheet below).

Speech: Students will deliver a speech on a particular topic from their cultural group. Grade is based on effectiveness of the verbal and nonverbal

delivery, form and effectiveness of introduction and conclusion, and organization of the speech (See sample speech grading sheet on next page).

 

POSSIBLE ORGANIZATIONAL PATTERNS FOR YOUR OUTLINE

Topical Chronological or Topical Chronological or Topical
Title:
General Purpose: To Inform
Specific Purpose: To tell my audience about ancient Egyptian pyramids.

I. Introduction

II. Body
A. When were the pyramids built?
B. Who built the pyramids?
C. There are many theories that try to explain why the pyramids were built.
1. One interesting theory claims that aliens were involved.
2. Another common theory says that the pyramids were tombs, but this claim has never been proven.
3. Did the pyramids serve another religious purpose?

III. Conclusion
Title:
General Purpose: To Inform
Specific Purpose: To inform my audience about how Independence Day is celebrated in the USA.

I. Introduction

II. Body
A. First, I will talk about the historical events leading up to independence.
B. Second, I will discuss how Independence Day was celebrated in the past.
C. Third, I will tell you how modern day Americans celebrate Independence Day.

III. Conclusion
Title:
General Purpose: To Inform
Specific Purpose: To inform my audience about the life and times of George Washington.

I. Introduction

II. Body
A. How did Washington become a leader?
B. What was Washington’s leadership style?
C. What were Washington’s major accomplishments?

III. Conclusion

 

PLAGIARISM

You have an ethical and legal responsibility to avoid plagiarism. Be aware that all speeches and written work must be your original work. Plagiarism is

defined as an unethical and illegal activity that includes using another student’s outline, using an outline found in a published work, or using an

outline from the internet. It is also plagiarism to work on your outline with a friend and turn in the outline without acknowledging your friend’s

input. When you use other sources within your outlines or speeches, then you must reveal the origin of those sources. Please utilize the following

guidelines for your outlines and speeches:

 Turn in 2 copies of typed and double-spaced speech outlines.
 Include in-text source citations within your outline.
 Include a bibliography (References or works cited) of all sources at the end of your outline.
 Include copies of any magazine articles, Internet sources, or book chapters used in your outline / speech.
 Include your outline worksheet

 

 Ways to utilize outside sources of information within your written work (in-text citations):
 Use quotation marks to surround direct quotes. Begley stated, “Don’t plagiarize” (P.A. Begley, Personal Communication, March 20, 2000).
 Paraphrase (put it into your own words): Begley expects students to complete their own work and to reveal sources (P.A. Begley, Personal

Communication, March 20, 2000).

[This is how you would cite your sources at the end of your paper.
Look at the sample outline for another example.]

APA Format Examples
1. NEWSPAPER ARTICLE (without author):
The water shortage crisis. (1990). San Diego Tribune, p. 5 & 12.
2. INTERVIEW:
Facts, S. D. (1993). [Interview] Lecturer at Mesa College.
3. MAGAZINE ARTICLE:
Onmi, D. S. (1990). The cost of taking a sumo wrestler to dinner. Bon Appetit, 15, 6-8.
4. BOOK
Honest, D. (1992). The Salem trials of the plagiarizing speech 103 student (2nd ed.). Randomville
CA: Plagiarism Press.

5. INTERNET

International campaign for Tibet: Traveling to Tibet (1998). [Internet] savetibet.org/background/overview4.html

WORKSHEET: CORE CONCEPTS OUTLINE

Title: _____________________________________________________________

I. Introduction
A. Attention Getter
B. Reason to Listen
C. Thesis Statement
D. Preview of main points

II. Body
A. (Main point sentence #1) [*Don’t forget to cite your sources within each section & use all five types of evidence!]:
1.

2.

3.

Transition:

B. (Main point sentence #2):
1.

2.

3.

 

Transition:

C. (Main point sentence #3):
1.

2.

3.

 

III. Conclusion
A. Restate thesis statement

B. Summary of main points

C. Tie back to Introduction

D. Reason to Remember

REFERENCES (You need at least 2 credible resources)
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

WE ACCEPT