optimal environment

o create an optimal environment for learning, we must consider more than just the furniture. Our brain is influenced by aromas in the room, music playing, and even the number of plants that populate the space. Describe a time from your own learning experience that was influenced in either a negative or positive way by the physical learning environment. Using examples from the course materials, describe your optimal environment for learning. Be sure to explain why you would include or exclude particular elements. In addition to the Willis and Mitchell (2014) textbook, Chapter 5 of the Given text and Chapter 6 of the Jensen text may also be useful.

Guided Response: Review several of your classmates’ posts and compare their learning experiences to your own. Suggest how you may have responded in their situation. Provide additional recommendations for creating the optimal environment for learning. Let them know how you would be influenced by what they have included in their optimal environment.

IN AN ATTACHED FILE I WILL INCLUDE THE WEEKS RESOURCES. IN A SECOND FILE I WILL INCLUDE THE STUDENTS POSTS THAT YOU ARE TO RESPOND TO. ONE PAGE IS TO BE DEDICATED TO THE INITIAL DISCUSSION POST, AND THE OTHER PAGE IS TO BE DEDICATED TO THE RESPONSES OF TWO OTHER STUDENTS POSTS FROM THE ATTACHED FILE.
MY OWN EXPERIENCE, I NEED ABSOLUTE QUIET WHEN WORKING ON HOMEWORK OR STUDYING. IF THERE IS MUSIC ON, I GET DISTRACTED AND START SINGING AND FOCUS MORE ON THE MUSIC THAN MY STUDIES. SAME THING IF THERE IS A TELEVISION ON, I TEND TO START WATCHING THE PROGRAM. I TAKE LONGER TO COMPREHEND AND ACCOMPLISH WORK WHEN THERE IS ANY NOISE IN THE ROOM. SMELLS DO NOT BOTHER ME AS LONG AS IT ISN’T A FOOD SMELL BECAUSE THEN I THINK ABOUT MY TUMMY. I CAN NOT FOCUS IF I AM TOO HOT OR TOO COLD EITHER. HOPE THAT HELPS IN THE INITIAL POST.

Comments from Support Team: Discipline: education special education

This is the information from file 1 and 2:

Required Resources this was one of the files. I will send the other one via message shortly.

Required Text

Willis, J., & Mitchell, G. (2014). The neuroscience of learning: Principles and applications for educators Links to an external site.[Electronic version]. Retrieved from https://content.ashford.edu/

Chapters 4: The Brain’s Emotional Processing Systems
Chapter 7: Long-term Memory
Chapter 8: The Executive Function Control Networks
Recommended Resources

Texts

Each of these texts is available through ebrary in the Ashford Library.

Fine, C. (2008). The Britiannica guide to the brain: A guided tour of the brain – mind, memory, and intelligence. Philadelphia, PA: Running Press.

Chapter 5: Behavior and Emotions
Chapter 6: Memory and Language
Given, B. (2002). Teaching to the brain’s natural learning systems. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Chapter 5: The Physical Learning System
Jensen, E. (2005). Teaching with the brain in mind. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Chapter 5: Emotional States
Chapter 6: Physical Environments for Learning
Torey, Z. (2009). The crucible of consciousness: An integrated theory of mind and brain. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Chapter 3: The Evolution of Language
Chapter 4: More About Language
Wolfe, P. (2010). Brain matters: Translating research into classroom practice. Alexandria, VA.: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development

Chapter 8: Sensory Memory: Getting Information into the Brain
Chapter 9: Working Memory: The Conscious Processing of Information
Chapter 10: Long-Term Memory: The Brain’s Storage System
Multimedia

Ashford University Library. (2013). Quick & dirty: The Ashford University Library (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.[Video file]. San Diego, CA: Ashford University

Ashford University Library. (2013). Using FindIt@AU to conduct research (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.[Video file]. San Diego, CA: Ashford University

this was the other file.

Each of these students posts need to be replied to individually as if speaking directly to the student.

Collapse SubdiscussionJinny Boling
Jinny Boling
Monday Sep 4 at 10:01am
Manage Discussion Entry
One reason is there are two parts to the brain, conscious and unconscious (Burnett, 2016). Though we may concentrate on, for example, studying with our conscious part, the unconscious part does not turn off (Burnett, 2016). Because of that, filling the void with something pleasant, music, rather than other distractions such as a neighbor mowing the lawn or a co-worker constantly sniffing due to a cold, helps certain individuals balance that unconscious part (Burnett, 2016). Others find listening to music too distracting because the dynamics in both the lyrics and tempo may cause them to lose concentration (Briggs, 2014). A study showed that only in between the breaks in sounds did brain activity peak (Briggs, 2014). It also explained why music is distracting to the brain because music “engages the areas of the brain involved with paying attention, making predictions, and updating the event in memory” (Briggs, 2014). From both articles I read, it seems that there are different levels of concentration that may work well for some to listen to music while others need complete silence. I think it goes beyond just listening to music. I have some friends that need to lock themselves in an office with no distractions to be able to get work done while others can sit in a living room with kids running around, the television on, and music playing, and still knock out their homework. I feel it is more contingent on that concentration level and not just the listening to music aspect.

Briggs, S. (2014, October 19). Why You Shouldn’t Listen to Music While Studying. Retrieved September 04, 2017, from http://www.opencolleges.edu.au/informed/other/why-you-shouldnt-listen-to-music-while-studying/

Burnett, D. (2016, August 20). Does music really help you concentrate? Retrieved September 4, 2017, from https://www.theguardian.com/education/2016/aug/20/does-music-really-help-you-concentrate

Kimberley Boone
Aug 31, 2017 Aug 31 at 4:27pm
Manage Discussion Entry
When I was in High School my Latin class was the most boring class. The work itself was both boring and confusing at times, and the classroom left you feeling depressed. It was an ugly plain institutional yellow and the few things on the walls were a faded picture with a saying I don’t even remember now and a pull-down map screen that was stuck partially closed. The classroom smelled of mothballs from the teacher’s sweater she wore. This class had a teacher, but you were pretty much self-taught and she just graded the tests and quizzes she gave. I promised myself then if I ever had the opportunity to design a classroom that would aid in learning I would do my best to never make one with this much negativity.

The ideal classroom environment for me would be one where there is an area where you can sit on big fluffy pillows and a rocking chair for the teacher to sit in to read to the students. It would also have an area where if you wanted to listen to soft music while you studied in headphones you could. I think a corner where there is a little color and some shelving with plants like lavender and rosemary on the top shelf and books on the other shelves adds some aroma, a rug on the floor adds a place where you can pick a book and plop on the carpet and read quietly. I would make sure that there is not faded old posters on the walls. If the paint was an ugly institutional color I will find ways to liven up the room just enough to not be overpowering to those who brilliant colors bother, but bright enough where it doesn’t make students feel depressed.

References:

Willis, J., & Mitchell, G. (2014). The neuroscience of learning: Principles and applications for educators. Bridgepoint Education Inc. Links to an external site. (Links to an external site.)P(5.u)

Prime Essay Services , written from scratch, delivered on time, at affordable rates!

WE ACCEPT