Applying Collaboration and eCommerce Techniques to Solve Business Problems

Starbucks celebrates five-year anniversary of my starbucks idea. (2013, Mar 29). Business Wire Retrieved from

http://search.proquest.com/docview/1321356704?accountid=458

Bush, M. (2008). Starbucks gets web 2.0 religion, but can it convert nonbelievers? Advertising Age, 79(12), 1-1,28. Retrieved from

http://search.proquest.com/docview/208370056?accountid=458

Laudon, K. C., Laudon, J. P. (01/2014). Essentials of MIS, 11th Edition [VitalSource Bookshelf version]. Retrieved from

https://bookshelf.vitalsource.com/books/9781323132821***
Analyze IT collaboration technology and eCommerce techniques that can be applied to my project changing Starbucks present legacy framework to an

iCloud base system.

Create a Microsoft® Word analysis of 825 words that includes the following:
Outline which type of collaboration technology you recommend for changing Starbucks present legacy framework to an iCloud base systemy and how

it will be implemented. Your goal is to enhance an internal (employee) or external (customer) facing business experience in a way that will

increase or facilitate business.
Describe available eCommerce techniques and your technique selection to be applied to your project.
Cite a minimum of 3 peer-reviewed references from the University of Phoenix Library.
Format consistent with APA guidelines.

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Table of contents
1. Starbucks gets Web 2.0 religion, but can it convert nonbelievers?
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Document 1 of 1
Starbucks gets Web 2.0 religion, but can it convert nonbelievers?
Author: Bush, Michael
ProQuest document link
Abstract:
Last week at its annual meeting Starbucks announced the launch of My Starbucks Idea, a social network where consumers can post ideas for how the

company can improve its service and products or comment and vote on others’ ideas. Consumers will be kept up to speed on what Starbucks is doing

with the proposed suggestions on a new blog, Ideas in Action. John Moore, a former Starbucks marketer, said this experiment will be interesting

to watch because Starbucks has never really listened to online conversations, a charge Starbucks denies.
Full text:
HOW MANY WAYS can its legion of latte-sipping loafers ask for free Wi-Fi? Starbucks is finding out.
Last week at its annual meeting, Starbucks announced the launch of My Starbucks Idea, a social network where consumers can post ideas for how

the company can improve its service and products or comment and vote on others’ ideas. Voting will be tallied online, with each idea assigned a

point value. Consumers will be kept up to speed on what Starbucks is doing with the proposed suggestions on a new blog, Ideas in Action.
Though the program sounds like a smart Web 2.0 move, it has already drawn a dart or two from observers of the company, and is likely to reignite

debate over whether brandcreated blogs or social networks are a smart attempt to empower consumers or a cynical attempt to advocate for the

company.
Jim Romenesko, keeper of the Starbucks Gossip blog, said, “It looks to me that it’s very repetitious. How many times do you want to read about

people suggesting free Wi-Fi?”
Of course, Mr. Romenesko has something to lose here as the reigning champion of Starbucks Hogging. But in terms of the repetition on the site,

he has a point. Nearly every other posting was an “idea” for more free drinks, which probably isn’t what Starbucks, which has been on a topdown

mission to get back some of its customer-service mojo, had in mind. But it’s not just clamoring for gratis internet connection and mochaccinos

that’s leading to criticism. Starbucks, after all, is something of a late convert to the customer-listening game, and there’s some indication

that it hasn’t been paying as much attention as it should have.
John Moore, a former Starbucks marketer, said this experiment will be interesting to watch because Starbucks has never really listened to online

conversations, a charge Starbucks denies.
This sort of online listening post worked for Dell, whose IdeaStorm website resulted in a few concrete product developments and, in turn, helped

to turn some of the computermaker’s fiercest critics. One of them, Jeff Jarvis, went from a state of high dudgeon on his blog to praise the

company in Business Week.
However, the coffee chain, which made a PR splash when it recently closed down its stores to retrain its baristas, isn’t getting the same sort

of raves. New York magazine, which called the network “the biggest and possibly worst idea” that came out of the company’s annual meeting, said,

after checking it out, that it resembled “a virtual suggestion box.”
Starbucks Director of Digital Strategy Alexandra Wheeler disagreed in an e-mail response to questions. “This site allows users to engage in

other people’s ideas and vote those that they like to the top,” she wrote. “Also, if you think about it, for years, Starbucks stores have served

as the center of vibrant communities, welcoming customers and encouraging creativity and dialogue.”
Then there’s the other side.
“It’s simply a corporate propaganda site,” Mr. Romenesko wrote on starbucksgossip.com, the site he launched three years ago to bring the

barista/customer conversations “taking place in the stores to die web.”
Speaking to Ad Age from a Starbucks, Mr. Romenesko said die company has been monitoring his site for years and mat it launched My Starbucks Idea

because it was growing tired of reading all die negative comments posted on his site. He guesstimates that 75% of the people on his site are

Starbucks employees and the remaining 25% are consumers.
On brandautopsy.com, Mr. Moore’s blog, one visitor commented: “I see no fun whatsoever in me initial rollout of this, and that’s what they

needed. … A blog post from CEO Howard Schulte snowing how ‘fun’ the concept will be. … Right now, it’s just a big Mission Review/Customer

Comment tank of the same ideas over and over again.”
Jim Nail, chief strategy and marketing officer for TNS Media Intelligence/Cymfony, called it an “excellent idea” for Starbucks. “It’s a natural

extension of their brand. And if they play their cards right they can open channels of communication to their detractors and by listening and

responding … dramatically change the tenor of those conversations.”
AuthorAffiliation
By MICHAEL BUSH
mbush@adage.com
Subject: Coffeehouses; Social networks; Customer services; Weblogs
Location: United States–US
Company / organization: Name: Starbucks Corp; NAICS: 722213
Classification: 2400: Public relations; 5250: Telecommunications systems & Internet communications; 9000: Short article; 9190: United States;

8380: Hotels & restaurants
Publication title: Advertising Age
Volume: 79
Issue: 12
Pages: 1,28
Number of pages: 2
Publication year: 2008
Publication date: Mar 24, 2008
Publisher: Crain Communications, Incorporated
Place of publication: Chicago
Country of publication: United States
Publication subject: Advertising And Public Relations, Business And Economics–Marketing And Purchasing
ISSN: 00018899
CODEN: ADVAAQ
Source type: Trade Journals
Language of publication: English
Document type: News
ProQuest document ID: 208370056
Document URL: http://search.proquest.com/docview/208370056?accountid=458
Copyright: Copyright Crain Communications, Incorporated Mar 24, 2008
Last updated: 2011-07-20
Database: ProQuest Central
Bibliography
Citation style: APA6

Bush, M. (2008). Starbucks gets web 2.0 religion, but can it convert nonbelievers? Advertising Age, 79(12), 1-1,28. Retrieved from

http://search.proquest.com/docview/208370056?accountid=458
Contact ProQuest
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Table of contents
1. Starbucks Celebrates Five-Year Anniversary of My Starbucks Idea
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Document 1 of 1
Starbucks Celebrates Five-Year Anniversary of My Starbucks Idea
ProQuest document link
Abstract:
Consumers helped introduce new flavors, including skinny beverages, Mocha Coconut Frappuccino Blended Beverages(TM) (Idea #144), Hazelnut

Macchiato (Idea #275) and Starbucks VIA(R) Pumpkin Spice Flavored Coffee (Idea #233) —
Full text:
MyStarbucksIdea.com has welcomed more than 150,000 ideas from customers, leading to the implementation of 277 new innovations for Starbucks
Starbucks
Linda Mills, +1-206-318-7100
press@starbucks.com
Today, consumers can walk into a Starbucks to order a “skinny” beverage, receive digital rewards for using their Starbucks Card and enjoy the

free Wi-Fi. These innovations, and hundreds more, have enhanced the Starbucks experience because of customer ideas shared on

MyStarbucksIdea.com.
This month, Starbucks celebrates a five-year milestone of innovation on MyStarbucksIdea.com, an online community for people to share, vote,

discuss and put into action ideas on how to enhance the Starbucks experience. The site was founded to create an open dialogue and collaborative

environment with consumers to share their thoughts and ideas and allow them to play a vital role in how they interact with Starbucks, both in

and out of stores. Here are just a few ways consumers have enhanced the Starbucks experience through My Starbucks Idea:
— Splash sticks have kept clothes cleaner for the past five years (Idea #1)
— There are more than 3 million mobile payment transactions per week in Starbucks US stores – including quite a few happening in drive thru

locations (Idea #202)
— Consumers helped introduce new flavors, including skinny beverages, Mocha Coconut Frappuccino Blended Beverages(TM) (Idea #144), Hazelnut

Macchiato (Idea #275) and Starbucks VIA(R) Pumpkin Spice Flavored Coffee (Idea #233)
— More than 5.8 million cake pop treats enjoyed each year, thanks to customers sharing ideas for smaller sized treats in Starbucks stores (Idea

#128)
“For five years, our passionate customers and partners have been sharing their ideas with us on My Starbucks Idea, and we have listened and

acted upon many amazing innovations that we have received from this online community,” said Alex Wheeler, vice president of global digital

marketing for Starbucks. “From digital rewards to new coffee flavors to the little extras, like splash sticks, that make your day easier, our

customers have incredible ideas that we can bring to life in stores worldwide. We don’t know what the next big idea from our customers may be,

but we’re thrilled to keeping listening, engaging and making adjustments to improve the Starbucks experience for fans everywhere.”
This is just a snapshot of the 150,000 consumer ideas submitted. Check out our infographic and visit www.mystarbucksidea.com to submit your own

idea.
Illustration
Caption: MyStarbucksIdea has launched 277 ideas from customers, and is celebrating its five-year anniversary this month. (Graphic: Business

Wire)
Subject: Restaurants; Mobile commerce; Coffeehouses; Competition
Publication title: Business Wire
Publication year: 2013
Publication date: Mar 29, 2013
Dateline: SEATTLE
Publisher: Business Wire
Place of publication: New York
Country of publication: United States
Publication subject: Business And Economics
Source type: Wire Feeds
Language of publication: English
Document type: Feature
ProQuest document ID: 1321356704
Document URL: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1321356704?accountid=458
Copyright: Copyright Business Wire 2013
Last updated: 2013-03-29
Database: ProQuest Central
Bibliography
Citation style: APA6

Starbucks celebrates five-year anniversary of my starbucks idea. (2013, Mar 29). Business Wire Retrieved from

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CHAPTER 2 Global E-business and Collaboration
(Laudon, 01/2014, p. 36)
Laudon, K. C., Laudon, J. P. (01/2014). Essentials of MIS, 11th Edition [VitalSource Bookshelf version]. Retrieved from

https://bookshelf.vitalsource.com/books/9781323132821
2.3 Systems for Collaboration and Social Business
With all these systems and information, you might wonder how is it possible to make sense of them? How do people working in firms pull it all

together, work towards common goals, and coordinate plans and actions? Information systems can’t make decisions, hire or fire people, sign

contracts, agree on deals, or adjust the price of goods to the marketplace. In addition to the types of systems we have just described,

businesses need special systems to support collaboration and teamwork.
WHAT IS COLLABORATION?
Collaboration is working with others to achieve shared and explicit goals. Collaboration focuses on task or mission accomplishment and usually

takes place in a business or other organization, and between businesses. You collaborate with a colleague in Tokyo having expertise on a topic

about which you know nothing. You collaborate with many colleagues in publishing a company blog. If you’re in a law firm, you collaborate with

accountants in an accounting firm in servicing the needs of a client with tax problems.
Collaboration can be short-lived, lasting a few minutes, or longer term, depending on the nature of the task and the relationship among

participants. Collaboration can be one-to-one or many-to-many.
Employees may collaborate in informal groups that are not a formal part of the business firm’s organizational structure or they may be organized

into formal teams. Teams have a specific mission that someone in the business assigned to them. Team members need to collaborate on the

accomplishment of specific tasks and collectively achieve the team mission. The team mission might be to “win the game,” or “increase online

sales by 10 percent.” Teams are often short-lived, depending on the problems they tackle and the length of time needed to find a solution and

accomplish the mission.
Collaboration and teamwork are more important today than ever for a variety of reasons.
• Changing nature of work. The nature of work has changed from factory manufacturing and pre-computer office work where each stage in the

production process occurred independently of one another, and was coordinated by supervisors. Work was organized into silos. Within a silo, work

passed from one machine tool station to another, from one desktop to another, until the finished product was completed. Today, the kinds of jobs

we have require much closer coordination and interaction among the parties involved in producing the service or product. A recent report from

the consulting firm McKinsey and Company argued that 41 percent of the U.S. labor force is now composed of jobs where interaction (talking, e-

mailing, presenting, and persuading) is the primary value-adding activity. Even in factories, workers today often work in production groups, or

pods.
• Growth of professional work. “Interaction” jobs tend to be professional jobs in the service sector that require close coordination, and

collaboration. Professional jobs require substantial education, and the sharing of information and opinions to get work done. Each actor on the

job brings specialized expertise to the problem, and all the actors need to take one another into account in order to accomplish the job.
• Changing organization of the firm. For most of the industrial age, managers organized work in a hierarchical fashion. Orders came down

the hierarchy, and responses moved back up the hierarchy. Today, work is organized into groups and teams, who are expected to develop their own

methods for accomplishing the task. Senior managers observe and measure results, but are much less likely to issue detailed orders or operating

procedures. In part this is because expertise and decision making power have been pushed down in organizations.
• Changing scope of the firm. The work of the firm has changed a single location to multiple locations—offices or factories throughout a

region, a nation, or even around the globe. For instance, Henry Ford developed the first mass-production automobile plant at a single Dearborn,

Michigan factory. In 2012, Ford employed over 166,000 people at around 90 plants and facilities worldwide. With this kind of global presence,

the need for close coordination of design, production, marketing, distribution, and service obviously takes on new importance and scale. Large

global companies need to have teams working on a global basis.
• Emphasis on innovation. Although we tend to attribute innovations in business and science to great individuals, these great individuals

are most likely working with a team of brilliant colleagues. Think of Bill Gates and Steve Jobs (founders of Microsoft and Apple), both of whom

are highly regarded innovators, and both of whom built strong collaborative teams to nurture and support innovation in their firms. Their

initial innovations derived from close collaboration with colleagues and partners. Innovation, in other words, is a group and social process,

and most innovations derive from collaboration among individuals in a lab, a business, or government agencies. Strong collaborative practices

and technologies are believed to increase the rate and quality of innovation.
• Changing culture of work and business. Most research on collaboration supports the notion that diverse teams produce better outputs

faster than individuals working on their own. Popular notions of the crowd (“crowdsourcing,” and the “wisdom of crowds”) also provide cultural

support for collaboration and teamwork.
(Laudon, 01/2014, pp. 56-57)
Laudon, K. C., Laudon, J. P. (01/2014). Essentials of MIS, 11th Edition [VitalSource Bookshelf version]. Retrieved from

https://bookshelf.vitalsource.com/books/9781323132821

CHAPTER 10 E-commerce: Digital Markets, Digital Goods
(Laudon, 01/2014, p. 328)
Laudon, K. C., Laudon, J. P. (01/2014). Essentials of MIS, 11th Edition [VitalSource Bookshelf version]. Retrieved from

https://bookshelf.vitalsource.com/books/9781323132821

TYPES OF E-COMMERCE
There are many ways to classify electronic commerce transactions—one is by looking at the nature of the participants. The three major electronic

commerce categories are business-to-consumer (B2C) e-commerce, business-to-business (B2B) e-commerce, and consumer-to-consumer (C2C) e-commerce.
• Business-to-consumer (B2C) electronic commerce involves retailing products and services to individual shoppers. BarnesandNoble.com,

which sells books, software, and music to individual consumers, is an example of B2C e-commerce.
• Business-to-business (B2B) electronic commerce involves sales of goods and services among businesses. ChemConnect’s Web site for buying

and selling chemicals and plastics is an example of B2B e-commerce.
• Consumer-to-consumer (C2C) electronic commerce involves consumers selling directly to consumers. For example, eBay, the giant Web

auction site, enables people to sell their goods to other consumers by auctioning their merchandise off to the highest bidder, or for a fixed

price. Craigslist is the most widely used platform used by consumers to buy from and sell directly to others.
Another way of classifying electronic commerce transactions is in terms of the platforms used by participants in a transaction. Until recently,

most e-commerce transactions took place using a personal computer connected to the Internet over wired networks. Several wireless mobile

alternatives have emerged: smartphones, tablet computers like iPads, dedicated e-readers like the Kindle, and smartphones and small tablet

computers using Wi-Fi wireless networks. The use of handheld wireless devices for purchasing goods and services from any location is termed

mobile commerce or m-commerce. Both business-to-business and business-to-consumer e-commerce transactions can take place using m-commerce

technology, which we discuss in detail in Section 10.3.
(Laudon, 01/2014, p. 341)
Laudon, K. C., Laudon, J. P. (01/2014). Essentials of MIS, 11th Edition [VitalSource Bookshelf version]. Retrieved from

https://bookshelf.vitalsource.com/books/9781323132821

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