Archive | Statistics RSS feed for this section

Benchmark – Case Study

Paper details:

Details:
Refer to Data Sets for Chapter 2 and Data Sets for Chapter 9. Complete Parts 1 and 2 of the case study assignment as follows:

Part 1

Business Statistics, A First Course offers cases at the end of each chapter, including “Managing Ashland MultiComm Services.”

Use the “Managing Ashland MultiComm Services” case to answer the following questions:

Chapter 2, Questions 1 and 2
Chapter 3, Questions 2 and 3
Chapter 5, Questions 1-3
Chapter 9, Questions 1 and 2
You are required to show all of your work/formulas to receive credit for the assignments. Failure to show your work/formulas will negatively affect your grade.

Part 2

Reflect on the “Managing Ashland MultiComm Services” case information presented throughout the assigned questions in Part 1. Write a 300-375 word explanation of how you would respond to the following scenario:

You have been asked by J. Doe, the leader of the technical operations department, to only test to see if there is a difference between the mean target and the actual results. Some employees in the department have mentioned that J. Doe is seeking approval for new equipment that will increase speed. Prior requests have been declined and the leader wants to use your results to prove new equipment is required.

Address the following in your response:

Ethical issues in business statistics and how your personal values are applied.
Which ethical guideline(s) are you applying? How?
How does the scenario affect your personal decision making as it related to statistics and ethics?
What guidance, using principles from a Christian worldview perspective, could be applied to understand and address these ethical issues presented in the scenario? The following GCU websites may be helpful: (a) GCU Doctrinal Statement (b) GCU Mission and Vision.
Provide two or three external resources to help frame the issue.
Prepare this assignment according to the guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required.

This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

Complete this assignment on excel.

Read More | Order Now

SIGNATURE STATISTICS INQUIRY

SIGNATURE STATISTICS INQUIRY ASSIGNMENT (description) The Signature Statistics Inquiry assignment is designed to expand and enhance the statistical knowledge you gain throughout the course. In particular you will exhibit and deepen the following skills: Critical Thinking Skills – to include creative thinking, innovation, inquiry, and analysis, evaluation and synthesis of information. Communication Skills – to include effective development, interpretation and expression of ideas through written, oral and visual communication. Empirical and Quantitative Skills – to include the manipulation and analysis of numerical data or observable facts resulting in informed conclusions. The Statistics Inquiry assignment will consist of thorough description and interpretive analysis of a data set. You may obtain data provided by your instructor or collect your own data to analyze. Extra credit is available for those who collect their own data.

Read More | Order Now

Statistics and Probability Question

 3.A researcher wonders if students will spend more time studying for a quiz if they are told that a high mark on that quiz will excuse them from writing a term paper. Two groups of college students were randomly selected from a large lecture course in art history. The students in Group 1 were simply told that they would have their first art-history quiz two days later. In Group 2, they were told the same thing, except that the promise of “no term paper” for high quiz performance was added. Just before taking the quiz, all students in both groups reported (in hours) the time they had spent preparing. In Group 1, the times were 6, 4, 7, 3, 2, 5, 7, 4, 7, 6. In Group 2 the times were 12, 9, 13, 10, 8, 7, 9, 6, 9, 6.
4. What is the IV?
5. What is the DV?
6. Calculate the means for each group
7. Calculate the standard deviations for each group
8. Calculate the standard errors of the means for each group
9. Calculate the SED for both groups combined
10. Calculate the independent t ratio 11. Is this a one-tail or two-tail hypothesis?
12. Do you reject or accept the null hypothesis?
13. Is the effect size small, medium, strong, or insignificant?
14. Are the two groups homoscedastic? 15. Based on your answer to #
15, what does that mean with regard to the two samples in problem # 4?
16. What test of significance is used to determine equality of variances between the two groups?
17. Write a sentence interpreting the outcome of the analysis.
Read More | Order Now

Probability and Statistics

1. In the 2012 Presidential election, Florida was one of the swing states in which no single candidate or party had overwhelming support. In a poll completed November 1, just one week before the election, the Tampa Bay Times found 51% in favor of Romney, 45% in favor of Obama and 4% undecided. On November 3rd, the opening line in the article of the Tampa Bay Times that reported the results of this poll sais “Florida continues to look good for Mitt Romney.” The poll was based on a sample of 800 likely voters. On election day, Romney received 49.1% of the votes in Florida and lost the state. What happened?
a) For each of the boldface numbers, indicate whether it is a parameter or a statistic. Explain your answer.
b) Suppose 49.1% of all voters supported Mitt Romney at the time of the poll. What are the mean and the standard deviation of p^ (pHat), the proportion of voters in a SRS of 800 voters who would support Romney?
c) Suppose 49.1% of all voters supported Mitt Romney at the time of the poll. What is the probability that at least 51% of the voters in an SRS of 800 voters would support Romney?

2. Greeks bucked a global trend in which people in most countries except their lives in five years to be better than their current lives. Even among those countries with much lower current life ratings, greater than optimism was found because people cannot fathom their lives getting worse. But in Greece, only 25% expect their lives to be better in 5 years than currently. In an SRS of 500 greek citizens, what is the probability that less than 30% of the sample expect their lives in 5 years to be better than their current lives?

3. Approximately 20% of cars in the US are white. You take an SRS of 300 cars parked in student lots on your campus and find 42 are white. For this problem, you can assume that you have obtained an SRS of student cars on campus.
a) what is the proportion, p^, of white cars in your sample?
b) If 20% of student cars on campus are white, what proportion of samples wpuld give a value of p^ as small as the value computed in (a)?
c) There are two explanations for your sample result. The first is that you obtained a sample with an unusually low percentage of white cars. What is an alternative explanation?

Read More | Order Now

In an SRS of 500 Greek citizens, what is the probability that less than 30% of the sample expect their lives in 5 years to be better than their current lives?

Greeks bucked a global trend in which people in most countries except their lives in five years to be better than their current lives. Even among those countries with much lower current life ratings, greater than optimism was found because people cannot fathom their lives getting worse. But in Greece, only 25% expect their lives to be better in 5 years than currently. In an SRS of 500 Greek citizens, what is the probability that less than 30% of the sample expect their lives in 5 years to be better than their current lives?

Read More | Order Now

Year 2016 is the election year for American president. One researcher wants to conduct a telephone survey to study the proportion of Americans who do not know that GOP stands for Grand Old Party.

Year 2016 is the election year for American president. One researcher wants to conduct a telephone survey to study the proportion of Americans who do not know that GOP stands for Grand Old Party.

a)What is the minimum number of Americans the researcher should have in a telephone survey to estimate the proportion of Americans who do not know that GOP stands for Grand Old Party within 3% margin of error at 95% confidence level?

b)Suppose one past study has shown that 55% of Americans who do not know that GOP stands for Grand Old Party. What is the minimum number of Americans the researcher should have in a telephone survey to estimate the proportion of Americans who do not know that GOP stands for Grand Old Party within 3% margin of error at 95% confidence level?

c)According to a telephone survey from a random sample of 1, 900 Americans, 1, 049 Americans do not know that GOP stands for Grand Old Party.

c )Construct a 95% confidence interval for the proportion of Americans who do not know that GOP stands for Grand Old Party.

d)Interpret the interval constructed in part (c).

Read More | Order Now

Presidential Physical Fitness exam

The American Heart Association conducted a study showing that only 20% of adults can meet the requirements to pass the Presidential Physical Fitness exam. If we do a study with 10 adults, what is the probability that exactly 3 will fail the exam?

Read More | Order Now

Quantitative Study of African Americans with type 2 Diabetes mellitus

You are interested to study age (18 – 85 years old), gender (male/female), self –efficacy (low, moderate, high), neighborhood safe for physical activity (yes/no), and physical activity (minutes per week) in a .

What is your indepedent variable?
What is your dependent variable?

Read More | Order Now

Statistics

You desire to do a study of ax murderers in American prisons. A preliminary study reveals that the mean IQ of a random sample of 156 ax murderers is 80, with a standard deviation of 24. Perform a 95% confidence interval on the mean IQ of ax murderers, and provide the interval. What exactly does this confidence interval tell me? (Be scientific, not sociological.)

Read More | Order Now

Empirical Methods in Communication

Empirical Methods in Communication

Briefly answer five essay questions that require you to dissect an experiment by Palomares and Lee, that was published in a 2010 issues of the Journal of Language and Social Psychology. Your answers must be typed and double spaced. Provide a 1½ inch margin on all sides of the page for written comments. Your paper must absolutely not be longer than 1000 words; that is about 200 words per question. All word processors have a word count feature. Please provide the word count of your essay (excluding your name and other identifying information).
Questions
1. Palomares and Lee used a 2x2x2 between-subjects factorial design. (This kind of design
is referred to as “between-subjects” because each research participant was assigned to
only one experimental condition.) Explain why this design was necessitated by the
research hypothesis.
2. Experimental control is a critical feature of any experiment. If we wish to know the effects
of independent variables on dependent variables we must “hold constant” other variables
that would make causal inference challenging. What efforts were taken in this experiment
to achieve a high level of experimental control?
3. What efforts were made to determine if the manipulations of the independent variables
were valid?
4. Did this experiment measure any potential mediating variables? If so, what were these
variables? If no, why not?
5. The generalizeability of every experiment has limitations, and this study is no exception.
Briefly describe how our ability to generalize from the findings obtained are limited.
Evaluation
Your answers to these five questions will be equally weighted. Evaluation is based on the
thoughtfulness of your response and the quality of your writing..

Read More | Order Now